News & Events

Summer 2020

Teaching

Brandon is working away at what will be a series on Physiology and Anatomy for Pilates teachers and serious practitioners. He is currently recording the first series on muscles.

From the basics to proprioception

The purpose of the course is to give Pilates practitioners – and truly those practicing yoga and other forms of fitness as well – an understanding of what a muscle is and does. Instead of being with bones and planes of movement, we look at the muscle itself. This allows us to talk about muscle growth and change, flexibility, and balance right from the beginning.

Pilates

Brandon has been taking some super Continuing Professional Development workshops to broaden and deepen his Pilates work:

He’s also teaching private classes. Get in touch if you’re interested! brandonxshaw@gmail.com.

Scholarship

Brandon is completing his second draft for Popular Dance in the U.S. (edited by Jen Atkins, Routledge Press, forthcoming) His chapter looks at Memphis Jooker Lil Buck, whose performance with cellist Yo-Yo Ma launched him into international fame. He considers how Lil Buck’s gliding, liquidy movement calls upon a long history of African American dance. He looks back at the history of the “moowalk” and double-jointedness in 80’s dance forms and their circulation outside of their original Black and Latino communities

Older News…

The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Dance is Out!

Book launch and C-DaRE Invite talk in Coventry!

Practical Research: Partnering Pedagogy and Limón Technique

Brandon has been undertaking some pedagogical research into teaching Limón technique to dancers without previous Limón experience. This aspect of the class was themed around the drops, and students were placed back-to-back to attain a sense of Limón concepts of Sequencing, Highest Point, and Suspension, as well as maintaining alignment in the sagittal or vertical planes.

Back-to-back Spinal sequencing

Teaching

Brandon is preparing a series of online lectures ofAfrican American dance. The focus is on interactions between African American vernacular and staged dance.

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